Monday, May 29, 2017

Interpretative Markers At Monterey Pass

We have been busy installing several markers. We are happy to say, we're at the half way point of installation.

All the red squares represent the markers currently installed. 
This is what is left to install.

This marker overlooks the site of the bridge where Col. Russel Alger of the 5th Michigan Cavalry charged and filed to the left. 

There's several markers located along Maria Furnace Road Trail that talks about the history of the road to the Civil War battle itself. 

Trail names were picked to reflect a retro-style theme from the formation of the state parks. For example, Billy Yank Trail was named for the area where the Union cavalry fought. The Johnny Reb Trail takes you down to the Maria Furnace Road Trail to where the Confederates were located.  

Four program sites have been created as gathering points and living history and programming stations. 

Telling the story of the Confederate Retreat from Gettysburg and the Union Pursuit from Gettysburg is very important to tell. 

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Pollution and the Historic Antietam Creek

4-6 Grades (Running Time: 45 minutes)
Maximum number of volunteers:  One to two  interpreters.
Theme:

Students will obtain a better understanding of how pollution spreads to our local waterways by interacting with an interpreter.  These waterways include the Antietam Creek which dumps into the Potomac River near Shepherdstown, WVA. From there the Potomac River flows to the Chesapeake Bay.
Objectives:

Using a visual aid, students will see first-hand how pollution affects the Antietam Creek. They will also learn that what happens in our area, could affect other water ways downstream.  

Materials Used:
1.       8.5x11 paper sheets
2.       Blue marker or crayon
3.       Pencils
4.       Sanitized trash like bottles, Styrofoam plates, cans…ect…

Procedure(s):
1. Give out one sheet of paper, one pencil and one blue marker or crayon to each person.

2. Instruct each person to color in half (landscape) of the paper blue without telling them that is a waterway. The white half of the paper, each student will use a pencil and draw what their dream house, dream business or dream farm would be.  Fifteen minutes should do just fine.
3. After the students are done, gather all students up and stand them in two lines facing each other. Starting with the front of the line have each student explain what their dream house, business, and or farm would be. The student will then lay the paper down with the white sections pointed toward their feet and the blue sections on both sides of the line connecting and making a creek.

4. Once all papers have been placed on the ground, then explain that the blue represents the Antietam Creek.
5. Go over the amount of pollution that is generated by their dream house, business, or farm. Pollutants can occur in from the rain, floods, or simply runoff.

6. Take however amount of sanitized trash and place it into the students hands. The bigger the dream, the more trash they will receive.
7. After all the trash has been handed out, start with the front of the lines and have each student pass their trash to the next student, so on and so forth. By the time all of the trash makes its way to the end of the lines, explain how trash and pollutants from upstream make their way downstream and dumps into the Potomac River which flows to the Chesapeake Bay.

8. After the last two children have all of the trash, ask them what they could have done differently to stop the pollution? Simple solutions could include recycle, not to build near the creek and so on. There isn’t really a wrong answer for this, as its more of a discussion to think outside of the box.

Closure: Ask the students what they could do in order to help protect the Antietam Creek? Such as landscaping, trees, or build further away from the creek.